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  1. Different religions and philosophies have varying views on the concept of the soul: 1. How Different Religions View the Concept of the Soul: Islam: In Islam, the soul, known as the "nafs," is a fundamental aspect of a person's existence. It is considered immortal and eternal. The soul's ultimate desRead more

    Different religions and philosophies have varying views on the concept of the soul:

    1. How Different Religions View the Concept of the Soul:

    • Islam: In Islam, the soul, known as the “nafs,” is a fundamental aspect of a person’s existence. It is considered immortal and eternal. The soul’s ultimate destiny is determined by one’s actions in this world. Believers who follow God’s guidance and do good deeds will attain a peaceful afterlife, while those who reject God’s guidance and commit evil deeds may face punishment.
    • Christianity: Christianity generally views the soul as immortal and created by God. Christian beliefs about the soul can vary among denominations. Some believe in the doctrine of “eternal life” where souls go to heaven or hell after death based on faith in Jesus Christ. Others believe in the concept of “purgatory,” a temporary state for purification.
    • Judaism: Judaism holds that the soul is eternal and created by God. There is a belief in an afterlife, but the details can vary among Jewish traditions. Some believe in resurrection, while others emphasize the idea of the soul’s journey and rejoining God.
    • Hinduism: Hinduism teaches a complex view of the soul, known as “Atman.” It is considered eternal, unchanging, and part of the universal consciousness (Brahman). The goal is to realize one’s oneness with Brahman through spiritual practices and break the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth (samsara).
    • Buddhism: Buddhism does not believe in an eternal soul (anatta). Instead, it teaches that the self is an illusion, and existence is a continuous cycle of birth, death, and rebirth (samsara). The goal is to attain Nirvana, a state of liberation from suffering and rebirth.
    • Sikhism: Sikhs believe in the concept of the soul (Atma), which is considered a spark of the Divine (Waheguru). The goal is to merge the individual soul with the Universal Soul through devotion and righteous living.

    2. The Concept of the Soul’s Weight (Gram) in Islam:

    • In Islam, there is a belief that the actions and deeds of a person are weighed on the Day of Judgment. The Quran mentions that even an atom’s weight of good or evil will be brought forth for judgment (Quran, Surah Al-Zalzalah, 99:7-8).

    3. The Concept of a Naik (Good) Soul and a Bad Soul in Islam:

    • Islam emphasizes the importance of purifying the soul through righteous deeds, sincere worship, and moral conduct. A “naik” or good soul is one that is inclined towards good actions, obedience to God, and compassion for others.
    • Conversely, a “bad” soul is one that indulges in sinful behavior, rejects God’s guidance, and is selfish or harmful to others. It is important to strive for self-purification and seek God’s forgiveness to improve one’s soul.

    These views on the soul are central to each religion’s teachings and help shape their beliefs about the afterlife, morality, and the purpose of human existence.

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